Inundation – The Great Sheffield Flood of 1864

£12.99

Inundation The Great Sheffield Flood of 1864
This new book, released April 18th 2014, about The Great Sheffield Flood of 1864 is by local Sheffield author Mick Drewry.
Within its, very informative, 164 pages Mick captures the heartbreak, death and destruction this huge wall of water caused. The inundation started when the dam at Dale Dyke broke its banks in the early hours of Saturday 12th March 1864. The book is very well illustrated throughout and has Lists of the Dead, Loss of Life Claims and a Supplementary List which was an addition to the official list of those killed as many other people died as a result of injuries received and/or illness contracted as a result of the Flood.

 

 

Author: Mick Drewry
Category: Product ID: 8153

Description

Inundation The Great Sheffield Flood of 1864
This new book, released April 18th 2014, about The Great Sheffield Flood of 1864 is by local Sheffield author Mick Drewry.
Within its, very informative, 164 pages Mick captures the heartbreak, death and destruction this huge wall of water caused. The inundation started when the dam at Dale Dyke broke its banks in the early hours of Saturday 12th March 1864. The book is very well illustrated throughout and has Lists of the Dead, Loss of Life Claims and a Supplementary List which was an addition to the official list of those killed as many other people died as a result of injuries received and/or illness contracted as a result of the Flood.
It has correspondence between an eleven year old granddaughter to her Grandmother detailing the night and talks of giving up all hope and then points out the fortitude of her uncle which saved the day.

Quotes
“Huge loss of life was visited upon the village of Malin Bridge and whole families perished in the lethal mass of water, and the debris it had collected along its devastating path.”

“As dawn broke on the morning of 12th March 1864 the enormity of what had occurred during the night was evidently clear.”

“Death and destruction flowed down the valley to Hill Bridge and Hillsborough, then on through Owlerton and Birley Meadows, where the River Loxley joined the River Don”

“A huge wall of water careered down the valley destroying all in its path; buildings on or near the banks of the River Loxley were simply washed away as if built of matchsticks and straw.”